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Brass Family

The brass family got its name because the instruments are made of brass.This family of instruments can play louder than any other in the orchestra and can also be heard from far away. Although their early ancestors are known to have been made of different material, today's modern instruments are made entirely of brass. Brass instruments are essentially very long pipes that widen at their ends into a bell-like shape. The pipes have been curved and twisted into different shapes to make them easier to hold and play.

Like the woodwind family, brass players use their breath to produce sound, but instead of blowing into a reed, you vibrate your own lips by buzzing them against a metal cup-shaped mouthpiece. The mouthpiece helps to amplify the buzzing of the lips, which creates the sound. Most brass instruments have valves attached to their long pipes; the valves look like buttons. When you press down on the valves, they open and close different parts of the pipe. You change the pitch and sound by pressing different valves and buzzing your lips harder or softer.

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Trumpet

1. Trumpet is a brass instrument commonly used in classical and jazz ensembles.
2. The trumpet group contains the instruments with the highest register in the brass family. 3. Trumpets are used in art music styles, for instance in orchestras, concert bands, and jazz ensembles, as well as in popular music.

Trombone

1. Nearly all trombones have a telescoping slide mechanism that varies the length of the instrument to change the pitch.
2. Many modern trombone models also use a valve attachment to lower the pitch of the instrument.
3. Variants such as the valve trombone and superbone have three valves similar to those on the trumpet.

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Horn

1. A horn is any of a family of musical instruments made of a tube, usually made of metal and often curved in various ways, with one narrow end into which the musician blows, and a wide end from which sound emerges.
2. In horns, unlike some other brass instruments such as the trumpet, the bore gradually increases in width through most of its length—that is to say, it is conical rather than cylindrical.
3. In jazz and popular-music contexts, the word may be used loosely to refer to any wind instrument, and a section of brass or woodwind instruments, or a mixture of the two, is called a horn section in these contexts.

Euphonium

1. The euphonium is a medium-sized, 3 or 4-valve, often compensating, conical-bore, tenor-voiced brass instrument that derives its name from the Ancient Greek word εὔφωνος euphōnos,meaning "well-sounding" or "sweet-voiced".
2. The euphonium is a valved instrument. Nearly all current models have piston valves, though some models with rotary valves do exist.
3. The euphonium may be played in bass clef as a non-transposing instrument or in treble clef as a transposing instrument. In British brass bands, it is typically treated as a treble-clef instrument, while in American band music, parts may be written in either treble clef or bass clef, or both.

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